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Explore Bay Area Social Movement History

March-May 2015

Free Public Talks

Wednesday evenings unless otherwise noted. At Eric Quezada Center for Culture and Politics, 518 Valencia, near 16th Street, San Francisco

A place to meet and talk unmediated by corporations, official spokespeople, religion, political parties, or dogma.

Download a pdf of our Spring 2015 calendar here.

Incite.../Insight! Free Film Events

Thursday evenings. At New Nothing Cinema, 16 Sherman Alley (near Folsom and 7th).

Shaping San Francisco, The New Nothing Cinema, and the Anthropology and Social Change Department at C.I.I.S. have been collaborating since fall 2012 to screen a film once a month focusing on local activism and political history.

Archive of past talks

Online audio archive of past talks, listed by type:

April 29 • 7:30 pm
Union Demise and New Workers’ Movements

Bureaucratic labor unions, long besieged, seem incapable of defending, let alone advancing, workers’ interests. In Africa, Asia, the Americas, and Europe, workers are rejecting leaders and forming authentic class-struggle unions rooted in sabotage, direct action, and striking to achieve concrete gains. Manny Ness, editor of New Forms Of Worker Organization, and Steve Early, contributor to Continental Crucible: Big Business, Workers and Unions in the Transformation of North America and author of Save Our Unions, co-hosted by PM Press.

May 6 • 7:30 pm
Rewilding and the Anthropocene

In a world where every inch has been impacted—directly or indirectly—by industrial society, what does it mean to “preserve nature”? How does the idea of adaptation shape our responses to extinction, climate chaos, and nature? How does our sense of “history” shape our ideas about nature, evolution, and conservation? How should we understand and value natural processes, wildness, and human technologies? With Peter S. Alagona, Annalee Newitz, and Noah Greenwald. Co-hosted by Wild Equity Institute.

May 13 • 7:30 pm
Plumbing California: Past, Present, and Future

Governor Jerry Brown is determined to build the Delta Tunnels through the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta. The once-and-future Peripheral Canal is the latest plumbing scheme to follow the damming and diking of rivers and swamps which began with intensive Chinese manual labor in the 19th century. California has already radically altered its plumbing, but we’ll also look to future efforts at riparian restoration, dam deconstruction, and maintaining or altering our massive hydrological infrastructure. Tim Stroshane, Jason Rainey, and Scott Kildall
(w/ 3-D maps of SF’s water infrastructure).